Root note lock  

 

(@lexblends)
Customer
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6
21/08/2018 10:43 am  

Hello everybody. I'd really like a function to "lock" the root when doing inversions. Let's say I play a CMaj9, i'd like my bass or root to stay in place when i'm inverting the rest of the notes in the chord. I want to move the voicing notes and not the bass wich in my case allways stays at the bottom 🙂 Hope i was clear enough ^^

Thanks!


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(@lexblends)
Customer
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6
21/08/2018 10:54 am  

And i forgot to mention a possible feature where you could mute the root note and just play the voicing notes (E G B D). Cause when you play with a bass, you don't allways need to play the root note on the keys 🙂


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 Bill
(@bill)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 21
21/08/2018 12:01 pm  

In the first post, if you "lock" the root note, it is no longer an inversion. To do that you'd need to create the chord in polyphonic mode and save it to MEM pads. so you could type in and save a C Major as C4,E4,G4,C5 and save it and think of it as a 1st inversion with the root in the bass. But it really is just a root position C with a chord spread of 1 (1 additional note added at the top). You could save it in a MEM pad from poly mode as C3,G4,C5,E5 and that is a 2nd inversion with a C in the bass, more commonly thought of as an open position (or open voiced) chord. The advantage in making and saving chords in poly mode is you can shove the lowest note into a lower octave and have a true bass note there.  Normally, you'd not try to play bass and chords at the same time, in real-time, with KordBot, but record chords on one track and then a second track for bass.

Inversions are similar to "slash chords" (C/E or C maj with an E in the bass aka E,G,C aka C Major 1st inversion), so writing C/C (C maj with a C in the bass) is redundant as root positions are assumed.

In the second post, that is what inversions are meant to, and already do. So if you play a 1st inversion C it's always E,G,C (you have shown an E minor 7 in root position in your post so that's a bit confusing, so if you wanted the combined bass + chord to sound like a C Maj 9, then play a C in the bass and an Em7 on top... broken down musically that's what's happening with the 2 voices used. A bass voice is playing a note C and a chord voice is playing an Em7. Together, they sound as if they were a C Maj 9 and so you either have to look at parts or at the whole to figure out where you really are).  In KEY+MOD note, the key you press lights up (even though it doesn't sound in the inversions). If you store that inversion to MEM pads and play them back, then the note keys display exactly what the chord notes are.

Finally, it's all so confusing because 'bass' is often used as a relative term when it actually shouldn't be. The 'bass' I've discussed above is really just the lowest tone in a chord. It gets called 'bass' a lot because SATB vocal writing breaks out the soprano, alto, tenor and bass ranges and so the note sung by a bass voice is a slightly different concept from a 'bass' note in a chord... Oddly we don't tend to call the 'rightmost', highest note in the chord the 'soprano' note... 😀 

This post was modified 1 year ago by Bill

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(@lexblends)
Customer
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6
27/08/2018 2:48 pm  

Thnaks a lot for your answer bill 🙂 I hadn't thought about doing it this way. Really helpful. Congrats for the great work!


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